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charge a few neurons
Wanda Halpert
neuroscience
Wanda Halpert
Propose your hypothesis
recklesswolf
neuroscience
recklesswolf
Hello Everyone,
I started a research recently about the Circadian Rhythm and how people who work in night shifts
and those in morning shifts have different sleeping patterns, behave and eat, also evaluated physical differences and their neurological function using math quizzes, brain teasers and also balance tests for the cerebellar function,

I would like to take this research to the next level and have someone do the same to 8 or more people who have different sleep patterns (work in the morning/night only) and tell me what they can find out by doing the same test the I mentioned.

My first 2 subjects were a Dj and a morning shift engineer, they were smokers and both were terminal disease free, I obtained the following results:
The Dj had low adaptability, he was fat (not obese), he ate randomly (lack of balance in the orexin/ghrelin secretion), his answers to the questionnaires were slower and less accurate, he was
constantly asking questions for clarification.

The worker was sharp, he was organized, he was always stressed with work, he had freckles(constant work in the sun), he solved the questionnaires a lot faster than the Dj.

If someone can further help me with my research, they would certainly do great good, if you are willing to help contact me on my email : Majed.Light@yahoo.com,
the more people assisting with this the greater the result and the better the conclusion as I barely have the time to conduct a survey myself alone and it's too expensive to hire people, I hope that I may reach a solid conclusion about the effect of sleep pattern and Circadian Rhythm

PS: I study in UMF Carol Davilla university and I also work in the research group but the lab projects are all taken by other students so I have to do my own research.
6 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
electricmonk333
neuroscience
electricmonk333
Does anyone have a pdf version they'd be willing to share? Thanks.
1 Experiment | Propose your hypothesis
lizardphunk
neuroscience
lizardphunk

I'm making a student presentation on mitoochondrial disease (15 minute lecture).

As I'm sitting here reading my articles, it seems to me that a lot of the dieases are "more prevalent in Northern Europe" (be it nuclear or mitochondrial mutations affecting mitochondrial function).

Coincidentally, I am in Norway, so maybe that's why this popped out. I haven't actually sat down and mapped the prevalences of the mutations. ;)

I was wondering if any of you guys know why this might be the case? Does it suggest that a specific group of people spread into the Scandinavias? Does it have anything to do with the Sami population (I know that some native american populations have a high incidende of specific mutations).

Examples are Leber's and Kjell's optic neurpathies, also PolG mutations leading to Alper's syndrome.

(x-posted to biology)
3 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
ir_besenok
neuroscience
ir_besenok
Dear colleagues!

I will be very happy to read the following article, but I have no subscription for it. Can anybody help me?

Cell Communication and Adhesion,
August 2011, Vol. 18, No. 4
Norepinephrine inhibits intercellular coupling in rat cardiomyocytes by ubiquitination of connexin43 gap junctions
Sarah Mollerup, Johannes P. Hofgaard, Thomas H. Braunstein, Ane Kjenseth, Edward Leithe, Edgar Rivedal, Niels-Henrik Holstein-Rathlou, and Morten Schak Nielsen

Thank you in advance,
olga239 (at) gmail.com

Propose your hypothesis
dirtyrich09
neuroscience
dirtyrich09
I'm an undergraduate who just became interested in neuroscience this month, so please excuse any errors in my "explanation" and I welcome any corrections. I'm reading a book about brain plasticity - previously thought to be impossible, but fairly recently proven as, to some extent, a reality of the nature of the brain. In short and over-simplistic summary, phantom libs have been explained as such: because the brain map interprets sensory information of your arms, or example, in close proximity to where it interprets sensory information from the face, your brain can actually experience physical feelings of the amputated limb when the skin of the face is stimulated. Pain of the phantom limb can also be neurologically explained with similar methods, though is more complicated (even in the simplest of terms) and I will not go into it here ("frozen" neural circuits and the like).

I personally find this to be really fascinating - it's like neuroscience that meets quantum mechanics and philosophy as they pertain to what we consider to be "real."

I'm looking for articles, books, etc on similar findings. Any help? Thanks a bunch.
3 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
rroselavy
neuroscience
rroselavy
Once again my university fails me. If anyone has access to the following article, I'd be grateful if you could mail it to me:

Development and psychometric properties of the brief test of attention
The Clinical Neuropsychologist
Volume 10, Issue 1, 1996, Pages 80 - 89
Authors: David Schretlena; Julie Hoida Bobholzb; Jason Brandta

rroselavy (at) gmail (dot) com
6 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
catchfuscia
neuroscience
catchfuscia
Hi all! A little while ago, I posted here about the new Master's of Neurocognitive Psychology here at the University of Oldenburg, Germany. We've finally gotten our new posters printed up, so I thought I would pop back in and share one.




Because we run on a winter/summer semester schedule, applications are due much later than in the UK or the States (deadline July 15th for the winter term which begins October 1st). Tuition and fees per semester are 769.50 Euros. You do not need to speak German in order to study this course. It's taught completely in English. Most students and faculty outside of the program speak English as well. Both the psych department and the International Student Office have experience working with students from all over the world, so there are plenty of resources available to foreign students.

X posted to psych_students and psychology
1 Experiment | Propose your hypothesis
catchfuscia
neuroscience
catchfuscia
Hi! My name is Jen and I'm a hybrid German/American. Recently the head of my department (I finished my degree in Cognitive Neuroscience not two weeks ago!) asked me if I'd be interested in doing some international advertising for our MSc. Neurocognitive Psychology program. I said, "Sure!" and then promptly realized that I have no idea how to go about doing this. So I turn to you, fellow LJers, for your ideas as far as platforms go.

What did you look for in a Master's?
Where did you look for Master's?
Did you consider studying outside of your home country? Why or why not?

We're an average sized Uni in the north of Germany, about an hour south of the North Sea and an hour East of Holland. Some of our pros are that tuition and fees add up to under 800 Euros per semester and that we are a small enough department that even lowly Bachelor students get practical experience using fMRI, EEG and TMS. That is the short version of it, just for now.

I'm working to get our website updated and a bit... um... smoother looking. If you're interested, here's the link:

http://www.psychologie.uni-oldenburg.de/46632.html
3 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
neuroscience
arborealcity
I'm not really sure if neuroscience encompasses neuropsychology, but it's the latter that I'm interested in. So please excuse me if I'm posting in the wrong community. My question is, what would I, as a high school student, have to do in order to become a neuropsychologist? I understand that the sciences and higher level mathematics classes are recommended during my time in high-school, but what would I major in when I go to college? I've read that one can either major in Biology or Psychology for their baccalaureate, but what after that?
8 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
trustpects
neuroscience
trustpects
Hello all,

There wasn't a community geared toward being supportive of those affected by frontal or temporal lobe brain injury, so I recently created one.

Here is a synopsis of the community:
WHO is this community for? People affected by frontal or temporal lobe traumatic brain injury (tbi) in one or more of the following ways: has a frontal or temporal tbi, interact with someone who has that, relevant medical professionals, students, and those simply interested in making a positive difference in the lives of those affected by that.
WHAT are this community's goals? Bringing individuals together to communicate with each other, discuss relevant topics, and share resources, support, and inspiration.

The community is located at http://community.livejournal.com/front_tmprl_tbi . I look forward to seeing you there. If you have any questions, please feel free to drop me a note.

Kind regards,
trustpects
2 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
rroselavy
neuroscience
rroselavy
Unfortunately my uni doesn't have access to this journal. If someone wouldn't mind, I'd appreciate if you could mail to rroselavy (at) gmail (dot) com

Assessing Anhedonia in Psychiatric Patients: The Pleasure Scale
Fawcett et al.
Arch Gen Psychiatry.1983; 40: 79-84.
6 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
lostwanderfound
neuroscience
lostwanderfound
Howdy folks;

I'm trying to get my hands on a trio of articles from BMJ Case Reports. All of them are published online, but none have yet made it into the print edition, and I don't have access to an online subscription where I am at the moment.

The articles in question are:

Dependence and psychosis with 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone) use. N Bajaj, D Mullen, S Wylie. BMJ Case Reports 2010:published online 3 November 2010, doi:10.1136/bcr.02.2010.2780

The serotonin syndrome as a result of mephedrone toxicity. Gerard Garrett, Michael Sweeney. BMJ Case Reports 2010:published online 21 September 2010, doi:10.1136/bcr.04.2010.2925

Methaemoglobinaemia due to mephedrone (‘snow’). Noor Ahmed, Brent Philip Sew Hoy, J McInerney. BMJ Case Reports 2010:published online 22 October 2010, doi:10.1136/bcr.04.2010.2879

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated...
4 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
neuroscience
laithalshawaf
 Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin are conducting an online survey to understand why people differ in their levels of disgust sensitivity. This survey takes about 15 minutes in total, and the study would benefit from your participation.

You must be 18+ years old and fluent in English to take this survey. These are the only requirements for participation. If you are interested in taking this survey, or learning some more about it, please click on this link:

http://qtrial.qualtrics.com/SE?SID=SV_3EolMi7ycaG6mlC

If you choose to participate, all of your answers will remain anonymous and confidential, and you will not be asked to provide any identifying information.

If you have any additional questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact the researchers at laith.alshawaf@mail.utexas.edu. Thank you for your consideration!

Sincerely,

Laith Al-Shawaf and David M.G. Lewis
1 Experiment | Propose your hypothesis
rroselavy
neuroscience
rroselavy
I would be ever so grateful if someone who has access to Science Direct could send me the following article:

Norms for depressed patients for the California verbal learning test: Associations with depression severity and self-report of cognitive difficulties

Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume 9, Issue 1, January-February 1994, Pages 81-88
doi:10.1016/0887-6177(94)90016-7
Copyright © 1993 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Rroselavy (at) gmail (dot) com


Got it, thank you!
2 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
charlycrash
neuroscience
charlycrash
If I seem a bit thick/ignorant it's because I'm no kind of neurobiologist: I'm a psych student, so all this is pretty difficult and new terrain for me.

I'm studying Hebbian theory at the moment and I'm having difficulty getting my nut around it, especially the effect of glutamate in hippocampal neurons. It seems pretty important to understand the biochemistry of it all so I feel like I really need to understand it and Wiki isn't being very helpful. So I'm going to write how I understand it working, and if someone could tell me whether it's correct or not I'd really appreciate it :)

Theory: when one neuron (simplifying massively, the neuron for the sound of a bell ringing) happens to fire at the same time as another neuron (the neuron for salivation), subsequent firings of the first neuron will be more likely to cause the second neuron to fire, and this remains the case for relatively long periods: days or weeks.

Biochemistry: Under normal conditions, the EPSP of the postsynaptic membrane of the second neuron is mediated by AMPA receptors alone. However, when the first neuron is stimulated to a certain degree and hence generates a sufficient amount of glutamate that the postsynaptic membrane is sufficiently depolarised, magnesium ions which normally block NMDA receptors due to the strong negativity of the posysynaptic membrane are driven away and the now-unblocked NMDA receptors allow an inrush of calcium ions through the membrane. The NMDA receptors stay unblocked for hours, days or weeks and hence when the first neuron is subsequently stimulated the second neuron will also be stimulated to a greater degree than normal because both AMPA and NMDA receptors are active i.e. an LTP (or short-term memory or association, if you will) has been created.

That much I *think* I understand but what I don't understand nearly as well is all the business with the calcium ions causing substances to diffuse across the postsynaptic membrane to affect the first neuron. What does that do? Does that mean that the LTP can also work in the other direction?

And some of the details of it all confuse me. The biochemistry above doesn't really line up with Hebbian theory where BOTH neurons firing creates an LTP. As far as I can tell, the biochemistry described only has anything to do with the degree of stimulation of the first neuron. Buh? I think I'm missing something. Is it that the postsynaptic membrane is more depolarised if both are firing at once?

Thanks! :)

x'ed about a bit
Propose your hypothesis
ir_besenok
neuroscience
ir_besenok
Dear colleagues!

Do anybody have asses to the following article?

Membrane-permeant phosphoinositide derivatives as modulators of growth factor signaling and neurite outgrowth.
Laketa V, Zarbakhsh S, Morbier E, Subramanian D, Dinkel C, Brumbaugh J, Zimmermann P, Pepperkok R, Schultz C.

Cell Biology and Cell Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany.


Thank you in advance.
I'll be really happy to get it!
olga239 (at) gmail . com
1 Experiment | Propose your hypothesis
morepurple
neuroscience
morepurple
Hello everyone,

I was wondering if there was a questionnaire out that asked subjects how comfortable they felt during an fMRI/MRI scan. I would appreciate any help finding something like this!

Thanks :)
Propose your hypothesis
msdhilton
neuroscience
msdhilton
I am looking for the article "Putting Thoughts into Action: Implants Tap the Thinking Brain" by Alan S. Brown. It is in the October/November 2008 issue, but now it's propriety: (http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=putting-thoughts-into-action). I'm a cheap college student who can't afford it. Does any fellow nerdo have this magazine stashed someplace that can scan a copy of it and send to me? I would be SO thankful.

Thanks!

2 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
neuroscience
ourdissertation
Research on Emotions and Interpersonal Experiences

Interested in winning a gift card for $25.00 to Itunes or Amazon.com?  Your choice!

Eligible participants are females between the ages of 18-25 who can read and write in English.  This study will ask about your memories of teasing that occurred in your childhood or adolescence.  The survey will take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

If you want to participate in the study with a chance to win a gift card, click the link below!

http://www.thewarholics.com/survey/index.htm

**Please delete if inappropriate**
Propose your hypothesis
msdhilton
neuroscience
msdhilton
Hi everyone,

I'm taking an advanced stats course in psychology, but my thesis data is ready for use (I haven't started collecting yet to be more specific). I am required to run some spss analyses on a data set to answer some hypotheses concerning the data set. I was curious to know if anyone has a data set that I might borrow for this purpose? It would be nice to see what types of interests others have in the field while doing this assignment. A neat data set would be preferred (ie. no missing variables etc.).

If anyone can help, I'd be very much appreciative.

Thanks!
1 Experiment | Propose your hypothesis
somedayalive
neuroscience
somedayalive
Hey all. My specific area of intended study is Neuropsychology, however I am having trouble finding much on what has already been established in the field. I was wondering if anyone knew of some places with articles and results of studies?

I'm also curious if anyone has somewhere I could look for universities with Neuropsych degrees specifically, as I've had trouble locating those as well.

Thanks in advance for any help you may offer!
12 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
neuroscience
holdup123
So I have a technical problem and hoping that maybe someone here may be able to provide their intellect on the issue.

My lab (we're new/small and the group hasn't started doing benchwork until I joined- previously it's been feeding studies and analysis of old data from my PI's postdoc). Essentially, since i'm the only grad student, I do all of the work- weee. I got trained on PCR by our lab tech, who received her training not too far before me in a cell lab. I recently got trained by our ABI product specialist, and after having some discussions with him i've become worried with the amount of replicates we are running. 
So from what i've been able to understand in the past 24 hours, technical samples can get away with running duplicates. However when you're running biological samples you need to run at the very least 3 replicates (because you're looking for differences under 1 cycle). This is already an issue for us because thus far we've only ran duplicates (remember we were trained off cell protocols). And before I start running the PCR for my PI's experiment I will switch to triplicates (in the liver at least). 

99% of our brain-work is with the medial basal hypothalamus, I know the brain is a tricky SOB to obtain RNA/DNA/anything from. Because of this, I probably should be using more than triplicates, right? For anyone who does PCR in this area, how many replicates do ya'll do for like membrane receptor expression?
And more specifically, I study cytokine expression in the MBH. I did duplicates, believe me i'm kicking myself now b/c I had 1 gene in particular that was so close to significance, that had I ran more replicates may have become significant. But, cytokine expression varies from cell to cell (as in one may not express anything where others will be expressing like it is its job). So because of this I will not need to use as many replicates, but I was wondering specifically if anyone else in this community has/does look at cytokine expression and how many replicates they use (?). 

thanks if anyone can help!!!
6 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
firemosa
neuroscience
firemosa
My small university doesn't have access to these journals, can anyone help me out here with one or both of these articles??? It would be of major help! reply here or email to bokorpop(at)gmail.com Thanks so much!

Farwell, L. A. and Smith, S. S. (2001). “Using Brain MERMER Testing to Detect Concealed Knowledge Despite Efforts to Conceal.” Journal of Forensic Sciences 46,1: 135-143

Farwell, L.A. and Richardson, D.C. (2006). “Brain Fingerprinting in Laboratory Conditions,”Psychophysiology, 43: S38.
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ninasafiri
neuroscience
ninasafiri

psych_article 
A space specifically for Psychology related articles in every field.
Studies, articles, and abstracts welcome.
Join the discussion today!


If this isn't allowed, my apologies and please delete.
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vvvvv
neuroscience
vvvvv
How did you decide where to go for your PhD? Or if you don't mind sharing this information, where did you go (/are you going) and why?

I am lucky enough to have to decide between several (neuro) programs, I really liked them all when I visited, and I don't know where to begin!
3 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
morepurple
neuroscience
morepurple
As someone who understands the functioning of the brain and human biology in general, would you still consider doing drugs? Would you be ok with dating someone who has an addiction?

Alcohol, and nicotine can be considered for this question as well. Not just illegal drugs.
27 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
halfbrain
neuroscience
halfbrain
Hi,

I'm looking to get myself a good textbook that focuses on molecular/cellular neuroscience. I have Kandel et al's Principles of Neural Science, but am looking at something that has more detail.

I'm particularly interested in learning about neuronal/glial architecture. Would be great if I can get information on plasticity and development. Searching on the web gives me links to many books, but I would love to hear your opinions.

Thanks in advance.
8 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
msdhilton
neuroscience
msdhilton

I am unable to access this issue, and was hoping someone might be able to help me?

The article is in Cell Death and Disease published today:

Imaging multiple phases of neurodegeneration: a novel approach to assessing cell death in vivo. M Francesca Cordeiro, Li Guo, Katy M Coxon, James Duggan, Shereen Nizari, Eduardo M Normando, Stefano L Sensi, Adam M Sillito, Frederick W Fitzke, Thomas E Salt and Stephen E Moss.

http://www.nature.com/cddis/marketing/article_preview.html

Thanks to anyone who can help!!!


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steinkind
neuroscience
steinkind
Hello,

I'm looking for a Neuroscience/Cognitive Neuroscience Forum, which is more or less active and also adresses specific scientific questions (for example, if I have questions about a specific type of data analysis, there might be people who would know what to do). Or well, just an active Neuroscience Board would actually be fine.
Anyone any recommendation? Please?

Thanks!
Propose your hypothesis
neuroscience
lordpenguin015
Hi,

Hope you don't mind this long post.

I'm looking all over the place for some guidance theese days. Here's my situation. I'm enrolled in a six year professional degree at Rice University, in architecture. I'm already in my fifth year, which means I've already graduated once with a BA in Archictecture, and I'm away on a one year internship thing (still part of enrollment) and in 2011 I'll graduate with a professional degree BArch.

However, I've been haivng second thoughts about this for a while, and it's jsut been escalating for the past two years up until now when I'm finally in the professional world and starting to realize that I can't stand architecture.. as a profession, as a study.. anything. It's just going to make me sad and poor for the rest of my life. I think I only stuck with it because I actually had some talent for it (made good grades, got good reviews, won prizes), and I couldn't bear to leave all my good friends I had made.

So, I've been considering to going the grad school for something else. I'm not exactly sure what yet, but if you had to force me to pick a field, I'd say something in neuroscience. I took psychology and neurolinguistics in college and I've started trying to familiarize myself with the field mroe by reading medical journals and magazines.. (I find it infinitely more interesting to read through something like scientific american mind, than I do any architecture magazine). The problem is, I definitely don't have any of the even most basic requirements to apply for grad science programs... I don't have a foundation at all (the most i ever took was calc 101 and phys 101 as far as science and math goes). The rest of my curriculum has been set in art and architectural theory and liberal arts type things..

Is it too late for me to switch? What should I do if I want to switch? Have any of you, or do you know anyone who's gone through a similar switch before? I definitely need to take as many of those prereq courses as possible, either during my last year at Rice or night classes/sumemr classses/post bach. But who would accept me as a grad candidate when there are people like you who have been working towards the right direction for four+ years already?

And I'm trying really hard to get fixated on this and not to be one of those people who wants to quit and start over once things are not going completely perfect. But I still want to realistically think about my options, and get started on the right track before it's too late. I know I'm probably asking for a lot more work, but last time I checked (before all the arsty fartsy classes took over) I think I was a pretty smart person and I work very hard towards my goals.

So, give me your advace. I'll be back with a lot more questions. thanks!
8 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
hyppocampus
neuroscience
hyppocampus
Hello there,

I have some experience working with E-Prime and Presentation, but things turned that way we should switch to a non-commercial experiment-building software for a while. Any suggestions on what I shall try?
The Wiki page gives a list to compare, I am inclined to try PsychoPy and PEBL - anyone experienced can say something good or bad?

Thanks for any kind of comments, anything will do.
8 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
steinkind
neuroscience
steinkind
Hello there!

I hope it's still within the boundaries of the community regulations, but I have an urgend question for anyone who is using Plexon recording hardware (or perhaps any other sort of hardware).

Plexon HeadstagesCollapse )
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wolodymyr
neuroscience
wolodymyr
Hello! Mine is a humble project - I'm writing a research paper for 2nd semester O-chem on drug synthesis. I've chosen Modafinil, aka Provigil. I've found papers online, and interestingly, my community college seems to be blocking access to the results of all searches whose terms include "synthesis" and the name of a drug.

FWIW, I understand the threatened consequences for attempting to convert the chem lab to your meth lab, but I hadn't realized we were also operating under a gag rule.

I have no desire for my synthesis discussion to be more than intellectual. And I would greatly appreciate your help, if you have pdf access to either:

"Anti-narcoleptic agent Modafinil and its sulfone: a novel facile synthesis and potential anti-epileptic activity" by Chatterjie N, Stables JP, Wang H, and Alexander GJ in Neurochem Res 2004 29(8):1481-6

or

"Keeping your students awake: facile microscale synthesis of Modafinil" by Aktoudianakis, Evangelos in the Journal of Chemical Education, v83 n12 p1832 Dec. 2006

thank you!
5 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis
lizardphunk
neuroscience
lizardphunk

I'm a 20 year old undergraduate (doing my BA) in Norway. I love neuroscience.

At the moment, I'm studying psychology, but I have a good deal of biological knowledge and I want to add this to my academic resume.
My country has a tradition of sending students out on exchange and I'm trying to decide where to try to go...

My question is a strange one:

What university - internationally, but in English - has the best neuroscience courses for undergraduates?

I'm talking biology, imaging, biopsychology, psychopharmacology, cognitive neuroscience - anything interesting or unique you'd want to immerse yourself in for a semester.

Please suggest your own university if it's indeed good. I want suggestions to look into. :)

Current Mood: curious curious

18 Experiments | Propose your hypothesis